Writing my way through the school year!

Archive for the ‘Education Blog’ Category

Genre Hunt:Using Books For Authentic Learning Moments!

Sometimes kids just want to do something that is fun. Meanwhile, I want fun and meaningful.

I gave them a @Quizizz pre-test on Genres and they bombed! They had an accuracy of about 42%, which told me that they knew almost nothing about genres. READ MORE

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Happy New Year! Suggestions for a Successful School Year!

It’s that time again! 2019-2020

I share these ideas twice a year. At the beginning of the school year, and the beginning of the year. I’ve made some changes to my list.

Some suggestions for the new year:

  1. treat all students fairly, regardless of race, gender, age, behavior, a parent’s nasty attitude, the comments from last year’s teachers, or a seemingly lack of interest in learning 
  2. to realize that all children can learn, but not always at the same pace.
  3. stop using sarcasm as a disciplinary tool, no matter how effective it may seem. READ MORE

Postcard Exchange:Authentic Learning Through Projects!

Some of the postcards we received!

I don´t remember if I saw it in an email or on Twitter, but the Postcard Exchange project caught my eye. It was sponsored by @techTOSAGina. This was her first one, as a matter of fact. Each teacher would be responsible for sending out 50 postcards to all the other classes on the list.

Sounded like an interesting way to teach Geography. READ MORE …

Originally posted on “Diary of a Public School Teacher…!” (Blogger)

“Cause I Ain’t Got No Pencil” – Why We Shouldn’t Sweat the Little Things!

I read the background story of Mr.Dickerson, the author of this poem, and it made me want to cry. The teacher made the student give her his shoe as collateral for a pencil. He had on dirty socks and all the kids started laughing at him. READ MORE

The Value of Veteran Educators… There is No Expiration Date.

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Category: Things that expire.

One of the concerns brought up at the NEA RA, ( National Education Association Representative Assembly), this year, was the reprehensible treatment of veteran educators. All over the United States, it seems veteran educators are under attack.

READ MORE…

I Am a Teacher And You Want to Arm Me?

I wiI will not be armedll NEVER carry a weapon, concealed or otherwise, in my classroom.

I will NEVER keep it locked in a safe.
I say this with the utmost certainty.

There is a huge debate going on about whether teachers should be armed in order to protect their students.
As usual, teachers’ voices are muted by the roar of non-educators who believe they know better. READ MORE…

5 Reasons I Am an EdTech Ambassador.

Top reasons, I am an edtech ambassador.

1. I LOVE the resource.

I use it. Often. That’s why I was chosen. Whatever the edtech tool or resource, it is a part of my classroom toolbox. It works for me and my students. It’s a tool that helps me, help my students. If it did not accomplish that task, I would not use it, and I definitely would not be an Ambassador.

2. I get to provide feedback that someone actually listens to. 

Think about it. Who wants feedback from a classroom teacher? Hardly anyone. The teachers in the classroom are rarely asked what they think, how they feel, how could we make this better? We are given the latest books written by authors who are not in the classroom, scripted curriculum, and orders about what next “new”thing we are to do with absolutely no consideration of our experience.

As an ambassador, teachers provide feedback, and get this…the edtech companies listen to us. We get to tell them what is working, what isn’t working, and what we would like to see happen with their product. We get to Beta test new features and give them our opinion about how it would work in our classroom. They are asking the advice of the people who are in the classroom, taking our advice, and making the product we use better!

3. I get a little swag.

FREE. The word teachers all over the world love. Why? Because much is expected of us, little is given. I have NEVER, and I mean never, in the years I have been an ambassador for any company, felt compromised. See #1. I write blog posts about it, share on Twitter, talk about it in Voxer, but these are things I would do anyway. We get some swag, a tshirt or keychain, items to give out at presentations, and maybe upgrades on the resource we are using. I have never been given a trip to the Caribbean.

4. I share with others.

When  I came across an edtech resource that enhanced the way I taught the curriculum, I did not want to keep it to myself. I came out of my comfort zone and became an edtech presenter. At that point in time, there were no teacher ambassadors. I was a teacher who had the ability to make another person more comfortable with integrating edtech. The edtech companies realized how we could benefit from each other and took the steps to create Ambassadors.

By the same token, who do I want to hear ideas from? The edtech creator or the ambassador in the trenches? Kudos to the edtech companies for providing a platform for teachers to share their knowledge with others!

In a week, I will be presenting on an edtech resource I started using last year. This company doesn’t have an ambassador program. If they get one, I will definitely take advantage of the opportunity to join. I am excited to share this resource with others because I am sure it is something they would love in  their classroom, as much as I love it in mine. And that’s the point.

5. Networking/Building your PLN(Professional Learning Network)

Integrating tech in the classroom is not everyone’s “thing.” Sometimes it is difficult to find like-minded people in your physical space. Being an ambassador provides that link to like-minded people all over the country and the world. The connections are limitless. I know the feedback they have contributed has helped many of the resources I use evolve into what they are now.

I don’t understand how teachers became villians for working with edtech companies as Ambassadors.

Here’s the problem.

From the viewpoint of our naysayers, we are “endorsing” a brand. Actually, we are sharing something that works in our classroom, a resource that we use and like anyway.


Good teachers don’t give up all other resources, and focus on the one(s) they are an Ambassador for.

It’s funny that athletes recieve millions of dollars to endorse a brand, people in Hollywood get designer clothing and jewelery worth thousands, sometimes millions, to wear to celebrity events.

And teachers are horrible because they get a tshirt and a premium subscription to an edtech resource?

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